Somali in Somalia

Population

8,040,000

Christian

0.30%

Evangelical

0.00%

Largest Religion

Main Language

Progress


Somali people video

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Profile Source: GAAPNet: Updated original Bethany people profile


Introduction / History

Over sixteen million Somali live scattered across eight countries in the northeastern portion of Africa, commonly called the "Horn of Africa," and in the Middle East. Over five million live in Ethiopia.

The Somali share a common language, adhere to a single faith, and share a cultural heritage that is an integral part of their nomadic lifestyle. Their name is derived from the words, "so maal," which literally mean, "Go milk a beast for yourself!" To the Somali, this is actually a rough expression of hospitality.

The Somali first appeared in the Horn of Africa around 1200 and began expanding westward and southward about 150 years later. They converted to Islam around 1550, under the influence of Arab traders that had settled along the coast of present-day Somalia. By 1650, they had moved into Ethiopia.


What are Their Lives Like?

Somali society is based on the nuclear family, consisting of a husband, wife, and children. A typical family owns a herd of sheep or goats, which the women and girls care for, and a few burden camels. Some may also own a herd of breeding and milking camels. The more camels a man has, the greater his prestige. The men and boys enjoy taking care of the prized camels.

The Somali consider themselves warriors. Sometimes the men leave the women in charge of the herds, so that they might train to become more effective fighters. They are a very individualistic people, sharply divided by clans. Fights often occur between the clans, resulting in many deaths.

There are four major Somali clan groups. The two largest are the Somaal and the Sab. The Somaal are primarily nomadic shepherds. The Sab usually settle in communities and live as farmers or craftsmen.

The nomads live in portable huts made of wooden branches covered with grass mats. The wife has her own hut, and the huts of related families are arranged in a circle with cattle pens in the middle. Making the home is the woman's responsibility. The huts are easily collapsible so that they can be loaded on pack animals and moved along with the herds. There is usually less than four inches of rainfall a year, so many times a Somali's life is dictated by his ability to find water. The nomad's diet used to consist only of milk and milk products. Now it includes maize meal, rice, meat, and wild fruits. The more settled Somali farmers live in permanent, round huts that are six to nine feet high. They have a more varied diet, which includes maize, sorghum, cowpeas, beans, rice, eggs, poultry, bananas, dates, mangoes, and tea.

Having an abundant supply of food is a status symbol among the clans. Each family periodically holds banquets for their relatives and friends. A family's prestige is determined by the frequency of its feasts, the number of people invited, and the quality and quantity of food served.

Somali's enjoy telling stories and learning history through their poetry. Many times they will chant folk tales on walks in the evening.

Most Somali wear brightly colored cloths draped over their bodies like togas. Some men also wear a kilt-like skirt.


What are Their Beliefs?

Although the Somali are nearly all Shafiite Muslims, numerous beliefs and traditions have been intermingled with their Islamic practices. The standard Islamic prayers are usually observed; however, Somali women have never worn the required veils. Somali frequently turn to the wadaad (a religious expert) for blessings, charms and advice in worldly matters.


What are Their Needs?

Very few Somali children attend school, and over half of the adults are illiterate. This is not surprising since they did not have a written script until 1972.

Access to modern health services is very limited in Ethiopia. Droughts, famines, and wars have created numerous problems. Malnutrition alone has accounted for the death of thousands of Somali since the 1970's.


Prayer Points

* Pray that the Somali's would come to know Jesus Christ, who is the Bread of Life.
* Pray for Somali Christians, who are greatly despised by their people.
* Ask God to touch the hearts of Christians in northern Ethiopia so that they would be willing to share God's love with the Somali's in the southern provinces.
* Ask the Lord to raise up Christian teachers who will work among the Somali and share Christ's love with them.
* Pray that God will raise up prayer teams to go and break up the soil through worship and intercession.
* Ask God to grant favor and wisdom to the missions agencies that are focusing on the Somali.
* Pray for effectiveness of the Jesus film among them.
* Ask God to anoint the Gospel as it goes forth via radio and television to the Somali.
* Ask the Holy Spirit to soften their hearts towards Christians so that they will be receptive to the Gospel.
* Ask the Lord to raise up strong local churches among the Somali.



Profile Source: GAAPNet: Updated original Bethany people profile Copyrighted ©: Yes Used with permission
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Country Somalia
Continent Africa
Region East and Southern Africa
10/40 Window Yes
Location in Country Widespread
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People Name General Somali
People Name in Country Somali
ROP3 Code 109392
Joshua Project People ID 14983
Indigenous Yes
Population in Somalia 8,040,000
Least-Reached Yes
Alternate Names for People Group Issa, Ogaden, Sab, Shabelle,
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Languages & Dialects (speakers if known) - up to 20 shown
Somali: Northern Somali 8,040,000
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Affinity Bloc Horn of Africa Peoples
People Cluster Somali
People Name General Somali
Ethnic Code CMT33e
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Largest Religion Islam
Buddhism
0.00%
Christianity
0.30%    ( Evangelical  0.00% )
Ethnic Religions
0.00%
Hinduism
0.00%
Islam
99.70%
Non-Religious
0.00%
Other / Small
0.00%
Unknown
0.00%
Christian Segments
Anglican
0.00%
Independent
12.00%
Protestant
3.00%
Orthodox
85.00%
Other Christian
0.00%
Roman Catholic
0.00%
Photo Source: Anonymous
Map Source: Joshua Project / Global Mapping International
Video Source: LinkUp Africa
Profile Source:
Data Sources: Data is compiled from various sources. Read more
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