Nisu, Yuanyang in China

Joshua Project has identified the Nisu, Yuanyang only in China

Population

253,000

Christian

1.5%

Evangelical

0.72%

Largest Religion

Main Language

Progress


Profile Source: Copyright © Operation China, Paul Hattaway


Identity

The Yuanyang Nisu are different from the other Nisu groups in southern China because of dialect differences and cultural variation. They have been included in the official Yi nationality by the Chinese authorities.


History

The Yuanyang Nisu are believed to have migrated into their present areas from locations to the north, such as Yuanjiang, Shiping, and Jianshui, during the Ming and Qing dynasties (1368-1911). Because of their geographic dispersion, their dialect and customs gradually evolved so that today this group should be considered distinct from other Nisu groups in China.


Customs

Unmarried Yuanyang Nisu girls wear cockscomb headdresses. Each hat contains as many as 1,200 silver beads. Even after marriage, Yuanyang Nisu women take pride in their clothing. Their headdresses are richly embroidered with laces that encircle the neck and flow down onto the back.


Religion

The Yuanyang Nisu are polytheistic animists. "They feel the need to appease many gods and ward off many forms of evil. On the first 'rat day' of the year, Yuanyang Nisu in some areas appoint one family from each village to appease the 'god of the path'. Two chickens are sacrificed at every path of entrance into the village. They construct crosses made of bamboo strips and fasten the chickens' heads, wings and feet to the crosses with rope. Having done so, the bloody crosses are erected at the gate of each village to ward off evil. Finally, the family in charge of the ritual chant the following spell: 'One mountain, one village, one village guardian, one village leader and all of the families under him - one path and all the doors along it - may the god of the path protect the paths to all the doors, may all the demons be frightened away. If we have succeeded, then come to our aid. We have worshipped you with a meat sacrifice; if you are satisfied then be our guardian from this day forward.'"


Christianity

There are about 2,000 Catholic and Protestant believers among the Yuanyang Nisu in Yuanyang County and surrounding areas. Missionaries translated Scripture portions into Yanyuang Nisu in 1913 and the entire New Testament in 1948, but the script used is now obsolete.



Profile Source: Operation China, Paul Hattaway Copyrighted ©: Yes Used with permission
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Country China
Continent Asia
Region Northeast Asia
10/40 Window Yes
Location in Country More than 200,000 Yuanyang Nisu live in southern Yunnan. Some 135,000 inhabit areas south of the Honghe River in Yuanyang, Honghe, Jinping, Yuanjiang, and Luchun counties. Others live in Mojiang, Jiangcheng, Pu'er, and Simao counties.
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People Name General Nisu, Yuanyang
People Name in Country Nisu, Yuanyang
ROP3 Code 114259
Joshua Project People ID 18638
Indigenous Yes
Population in China 253,000
Least-Reached Yes
Alternate Names for People Group Hei Yi, Lolo, Luoluo, Neisu, Niesu, Nisu, Nisupo, Nuosu,
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Languages & Dialects (speakers if known) - up to 20 shown
Nisu, Eastern 253,092
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Affinity Bloc Tibetan-Himalayan Peoples
People Cluster Tibeto-Burman, other
People Name General Nisu, Yuanyang
Ethnic Code MSY50i
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Largest Religion Ethnic Religions
Buddhism
0.00%
Christianity
1.5%    ( Evangelical  0.72% )
Ethnic Religions
92.50%
Hinduism
0.00%
Islam
0.00%
Non-Religious
6.00%
Other / Small
0.00%
Unknown
0.00%
Christian Segments
Anglican
0.00%
Independent
50.00%
Protestant
0.00%
Orthodox
0.00%
Other Christian
0.00%
Roman Catholic
50.00%
Photo Source: Operation China, Paul Hattaway Copyrighted ©: Yes Used with permission
Map Source: Joshua Project / Global Mapping International
Profile Source:
Data Sources: Data is compiled from various sources. Read more
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