Swahili, Zanzibari, Unguja in Oman

Population

72,700

Christian

Evangelical

0.00%

Largest Religion

Main Language

Progress


Introduction / History

The Swahili-Arab people come from east coast of Africa, mainly Zanzibar, Bagamoyo, and Dar es Salaam, although there are families from the interior regions such as Mwanza. They are a mixture of Omani and some Yemeni Arabs who travelled to East Africa in the 1700's to establish trade with Europe, primarily in slaves. These Arabs had children with their African wives and slaves. In the mid-sixties an African revolution against Arabs in East Africa resulted in the killing of tens of thousands of Omani and Yemeni people. It was after this that the current ruler of Oman, Sultan Qaboos bin Said invited any Omanis living in East Africa back to Oman. Since these people and their families had traded with Britain they were educated and knew English. Qaboos gave them high paying jobs in oil and gas and the government.


Where are they Located?

Most Swahili-Arabs are located on the coast and largely in Muscat and the surrounding areas.


What are Their Lives Like?

On the surface Swahili-Arabs function just like regular Omanis. However, when one sits with them at a meal it is when the African roots come out. Much of the time Swahili is spoken instead of Arabic, which is considered the trade language, and the food is much more African. While in some homes men and women eating separately is the norm like other Omanis, some Swahili-Arabs will eat jointly.


What are Their Beliefs?

Swahili-Arabs are Muslim and most follow the Ibadhi sect of Islam. According to locals, this sect is the most peaceful of the Islamic sects. The welcoming nature they have toward guests would agree with this statement.


Prayer Points

While Islam is most definitely the number one thing Satan uses to blind these people, materialism is a close second. Pray that God would open the hearts of these people and allow the gospel to get into their homes.


Profile Source:   Anonymous  

People Name General Swahili, Zanzibari
People Name in Country Swahili, Zanzibari, Unguja
Population in Oman 72,700
World Population 83,000
Countries 2
Progress Scale 1.1
Least-Reached Yes
Indigenous Yes
Alternate Names Hadimu, Zanzibari
Affinity Bloc Sub-Saharan Peoples
People Cluster Bantu, Swahili
People Name General Swahili, Zanzibari
Ethnic Code NAB57j
Country Oman
Region Middle East and North Africa
Continent Asia
10/40 Window Yes
Persecution Rank 27  (Open Doors top 50 rank, 1 = highest persecution rankinging, )

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Languages & Dialects (speakers if known) - up to 20 shown
Swahili: Mvita (Unknown)
Languages & Dialects (speakers if known) - up to 20 shown
Swahili: Mvita
Bible Translation Status  (Years)
Bible Portions Yes   (1868-1968)
New Testament Yes   (1879-1989)
Complete Bible Yes   (1891-2009)
Audio Bible Online
Category Resource
Audio Recordings Fathers Love Letter
Audio Recordings Global Recordings
Audio Recordings Online New Testament - Habari Njema (FCBH)
Audio Recordings Online New Testament - Interconfessional (FCBH)
Audio Recordings Online scripture (Talking Bibles)
Audio Recordings Story of Jesus audio (Jesus Film Project)
Film / Video God's Story Video
Film / Video Jesus Film: view in Swahili
Film / Video Magdalena (Jesus Film Project)
Film / Video My Last Day (Jesus Film Project Anime)
Film / Video Story of Jesus for Children (JF Project)
Film / Video Walk with Jesus (Africa, JFP)
General Bible Visuals
General Four Spiritual Laws
General Gods Simple Plan
General Got Questions Ministry
Scripture Bible Gateway Scripture
Scripture Bible-in-Your-Language
Scripture EasyBibles
Scripture EasyBibles

Major Religion Percent
Buddhism
0.00 %
Christianity  (Evangelical 0.00 %)
0.00 %
Ethnic Religions
0.00 %
Hinduism
0.00 %
Islam
100.00 %
Non-Religious
0.00 %
Other / Small
0.00 %
Unknown
0.00 %
Photo Source: Anonymous  
Profile Source: Anonymous  
Data Sources: Data is compiled from various sources. Read more
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