Japanese in Canada



Population

42,900

Christian

Evangelical

Largest Religion

Main Language

Progress


Introduction / History

Japanese Canadians now contribute much to Canada economically, culturally, politically and otherwise. The first Japanese immigrants came to Canada from 1877 to 1928. Most lived in British Columbia and worked in farming, fishing and pulp mills. Some lived in Alberta. After 1928, Canada limited Japanese immigration and the ones that were in Canada found life hard. They began having their own communities.

During World War II, they were sent to detention places and to prisoner of war camps. At the end of the war if they wanted to remain in Canada they had to go east of the Rocky Mountains. Many went to Ontario, Quebec or the Prairie provinces. In the 1950s life was difficult for them.

After 1967 more Japanese immigrants came to Canada, mainly due to changes in the Immigration Act. They were usually educated and they spoke English or French. Many worked in service occupations and in skilled trades.


What are Their Lives Like?

Now Canadians of Japanese descent live in several places in Canada, mainly in the provinces of British Columbia, Ontario and Alberta.

Most Canadians of Japanese descent now were born in Canada. Most of them live in Vancouver or Toronto. Many of them are under 24 years of age.

The majority have said that they do not belong to any religion. Only a few are single parents. A lot of them have university degrees. According to a survey, most Japanese Canadians said they felt they belonged in Canada.


Prayer Points

* Pray that a way is found so that the Japanese including the young find relevance in the Gospel message and give their lives to Jesus Christ.

References

www.asia-canada.ca/changing-perspectives/japanese
www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-621-x/89-621-x2007013-eng.htm


Profile Source:   Anonymous  

Prayer Links
Global Prayer Digest: 2009-05-26
People Name General Japanese
People Name in Country Japanese
Population in Canada 43,000
World Population 124,714,000
Countries 44
Progress Scale 1.2
Least-Reached Yes
Indigenous Yes
Alternate Names Ko, Nihonjin
Affinity Bloc East Asian Peoples
People Cluster Japanese
People Name General Japanese
Ethnic Code MSY45a
People ID 12322

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Enthologue Language Map



Languages & Dialects on file:  1  (up to 20 largest shown)
Japanese (43,000)
Languages & Dialects (speakers if known) - up to 20 shown
Japanese 43,000
Bible Translation Status  (Years)
Bible Portions Yes   (1837-1992)
New Testament Yes   (1879-1993)
Complete Bible Yes   (1883-1987)
Audio Bible Online
Format Resource
Audio Recordings Audio Bible teaching (GRN)
Audio Recordings Christ for the Nations
Audio Recordings Online New Testament (FCBH)
Audio Recordings Story of Jesus audio (Jesus Film Project)
Film / Video Fathers Love Letter
Film / Video God's Story Video
Film / Video Jesus Film: view in Japanese
Film / Video Magdalena (Jesus Film Project)
Film / Video My Last Day (Jesus Film Project Anime)
Film / Video Story of Jesus for Children (JF Project)
Film / Video The Hope Video
General Bible Visuals
General Four Spiritual Laws
General Got Questions Ministry
Text / Printed Matter Bible Gateway Scripture
Text / Printed Matter Bible-in-Your-Language
Text / Printed Matter Bible: Biblica Japanese
Text / Printed Matter Bible: Colloquial Japanese (1955)
Text / Printed Matter EasyBibles
Text / Printed Matter International Bible Society

Major Religion Percent
Buddhism
90.00 %
Christianity  (Evangelical 0.80 %)
3.00 %
Ethnic Religions
0.00 %
Hinduism
0.00 %
Islam
0.00 %
Non-Religious
0.50 %
Other / Small
6.50 %
Unknown
0.00 %

Christian Segments Percent
Anglican
0.4 %
Independent
8.0 %
Orthodox
0.0 %
Other Christian
18.6 %
Protestant
35.0 %
Roman Catholic
38.0 %
Photo Source: EnricX   Creative Commons  
Profile Source: Anonymous  
Data Sources: Data is compiled from various sources. Read more
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